Andrew N. Rubin

"This is a brilliant and highly original investigation of how Cold War politics shaped the emergence of world literature and new forms of cultural authority, literary consecration, and political surveillance in the aftermath of the Second World War. Eye-opening and provocative, Archives of Authority is indispensable reading for all serious scholars of world literature, Cold War cultural politics, and globalization.”

 

 —Anne McClintock, Simone de Beauvoir Professor of Literature,  University of Wisconsin at Madison

Archives of Authority: Empire, Culture, and the Cold War

ANDREW N. RUBIN

Winner of a 2014 Lannan Literary Fellowship for Nonfiction

 

Hardcover | 2012 | $30.77 / 20.97) |

 ISBN: 9780691154152

 

Princeton University Press

Series: Translation/Transnation

Emily Apter, Series Editor

 

 

"... an exciting exploration of important categories in world literature, a lucid explanation for its rise and fall, and an excellent argument for its careful reconsideration."

 

—Paul Bové, Distinguished Professor, University of Pittsburgh

 

 

 

"[Rubin's] critique of cultural instrumentality and appeal for a Said-inflected humanism speak to the stakes of intellectual inquiry, reminding us that in exposing the process by which an unjust world is made, we arm ourselves with the tools to build a different one."

 

—Kirsten Weld, Harvard University, Journal of Archival Organization

READ REVIEW IN MODERNISM/MODERNITY

READ REVIEW IN  JOURNAL OF ARCHIVAL ORGANIZATION

READ CHAPTER 1

THE EDWARD SAID READER

Edited by ANDREW N. RUBIN AND MOUSTAFA BAYOUMI

 

 

A New York Times' New & Noteworthy Paperback, 2000

 

".... a timely consolidation of the work of arguably the most influential intellectual of our time. "

—The Guardian

"The publication of The Edward Said Reader, a new collection of his diverse writings, should eliminate the temptation to make such facile divisions. The editors of this volume have made the wise decision to organize it not by genre or theme but by chronology. This may seem an obvious choice, but it should not be ignored. The chronological approach encourages us to focus on the continuity in Mr. Said's thought amidst the great fluctuations in his material. This volume -- though culled from literary monographs, political tracts, cultural critique, essays on music and a memoir -- gives us Edward Said in his ferocious unity."

                                                                                                                                                                      –Aaron Matz, The New York Observer

 

Adorno: A Critical Reader

Edited by Andrew N. Rubin and Nigel Gibson